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Water Department

Fire pump and Boosters

Marshall Well Booster Station 

 

Click the Faucet below to view our Video starring Idaho State Bicycling Champion Rick Greenawald, which was produced in cooperation with the City of Jerome and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality to bring attention to "Source Water Protection" 

 

Water faucet

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

 

Backflow Program;  

For more information please visit Backflow Page. Please remember that your backflow device is required to be tested Annually by June 1st.

List of Approved Backflow Assemby Testers 

 

 

 

Helpful Information

 Local reservoir storage information;    http://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/burtea.html

 Source Water Assessment site;   http://mapcase.deq.idaho.gov/swa/

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

 http://www.deq.idaho.gov/water-quality.aspx

The Environmental Protection Agency

 EPA Source water protection page;    http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/drinkingwater/sourcewater/protection/index.cfm

 EPA Educational tools ;    http://water.epa.gov/learn/

 EPA Underground Injection wells  http://water.epa.gov/type/groundwater/uic/index.cfm

 EPA Arsenic help;    http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/arsenic.cfm

What are Nitrates?

What is nitrate?
Nitrates and nitrites are nitrogen-oxygen chemical units which combine with various organic and inorganic compounds.

 

Uses for nitrate.
The greatest use of nitrates is as a fertilizer. Once taken into the body, nitrates are converted to nitrites.

 

What are nitrate's health effects?
Infants below six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the maximum contaminant level (MCL) could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome. This health effects language is not intended to catalog all possible health effects for nitrate. Rather, it is intended to inform consumers of some of the possible health effects associated with nitrate in drinking water when the rule was finalized.

What are EPA's drinking water regulations for nitrate?
In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water Act. This law requires EPA to determine the level of contaminants in drinking water at which no adverse health effects are likely to occur. These non-enforceable health goals, based solely on possible health risks and exposure over a lifetime with an adequate margin of safety, are called maximum contaminant level goals (MCLG). Contaminants are any physical, chemical, biological or radiological substances or matter in water.

The MCLG for nitrate is 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. EPA has set this level of protection based on the best available science to prevent potential health problems. EPA has set an enforceable regulation for nitrate, called a maximum contaminant level (MCL), at 10 mg/L or 10 ppm. MCLs are set as close to the health goals as possible, considering cost, benefits and the ability of public water systems to detect and remove contaminants using suitable treatment technologies. In this case, the MCL equals the MCLG, because analytical methods or treatment technology do not pose any limitation.

The Phase II Rule , the regulation for nitrate, became effective in 1992. The Safe Drinking Water Act requires EPA to periodically review the national primary drinking water regulation for each contaminant and revise the regulation, if appropriate. EPA reviewed nitrate as part of the Six Year Review and determined that the 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCLG and 10 mg/L or 10 ppm MCL for nitrate are still protective of human health.

What is Arsenic?

What is arsenic?
Arsenic is a semi-metal element in the periodic table. It is odorless and tasteless. It enters drinking water supplies from natural deposits in the earth or from agricultural and industrial practices.

Uses for arsenic.
Approximately 90 percent of industrial arsenic in the U.S. is currently used as a wood preservative, but arsenic is also used in paints, dyes, metals, drugs, soaps, and semi-conductors. Agricultural applications, mining, and smelting also contribute to arsenic releases in the environment.

What are arsenic's health effects?
Some people who drink water containingarsenic well in excess of the MCL for many years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

This health effects language is not intended to catalog all possible health effects for arsenic. Rather, it is intended to inform consumers of some of the possible health effects associated with epichlorohydrin in drinking water when tThe MCLG for arsenic is zero.  EPA has set this level of protection based on the best available science to prevent potential health problems. Based on the MCLG, EPA has set an enforceable regulation for arsenic, called a maximum contaminant level (MCL), at 0.010 mg/L or 10 ppb.  MCLs are set as close to the health goals as possible, considering cost, benefits and the ability of public water systems to detect and remove contaminants using suitable treatment technologies.

The Arsenic and Clarifications to Compliance and New Source Contaminants Monitoring Final Rule, the regulation for arsenic, became effective in 2002. The Safe Drinking Water Act requires EPA to periodically review and revise contaminants, if appropriate, based on new scientific data.  The regulation for arsenic will be included in a future review cycle.

How does arsenic get into my drinking water?
The major sources of arsenic in drinking water are erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; and runoff from glass & electronics production wastes.

 

Freezing Weather!

Here are some suggestions to help you if your pipes freeze...

  1. You can use an an electric heat gun or hair dryer to warm frozen areas.
  2. If only one faucet in your home is frozen and not working, then the freeze is in the water supply to that faucet only.
  3. Try feeling the pipes running to that fixture. If one area is much colder than others, that's likely where the freeze is.
  4. If a pipe that's frozen is in a crawl space, you can put an indoor space heater in the crawl space to warm it,although please be very careful an unattended heater can be very dangerous!
  5. If you have a non-insulated soft water loop in your garage, that's often the location of a freeze that's affecting your home.
  6. Importantly, you should NEVER use an open flame or any large heater made for outdoor use inside or under your home to thaw frozen pipes. You can easily start a major fire this way. 

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